Ep. 3 Lyrical Lesson – How Can I Teach a White Child to Challenge Racism without Guilt or Shame?

When Pastor Jamey referenced the song I Need You to Survive as a source of inspiration and encouragement, I immediately thought of my childhood church. Our programs garnered media attention during Black History Month and MLK celebrations and in several of those programs our youth group performed to the song. I remember passionately expressing its beautiful and powerful message to every person sitting in the pews. It wasn’t uncommon to see individuals quietly weeping where they sat, whether they were a stranger passing through or a familiar face. The message of this song is timeless and reiterates Pastor Jamey’s call for love in action.

 

I Need You to Survive – Hezekiah Walker

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Ep. 3 How Can I Teach a White Child to Challenge Racism without Guilt or Shame? – Pastor Jamey Johnson

Welcome to the H.U.E Podcast!

*SPECIAL NOTE – If you have not done so, please listen to the Introduction Episode of this series first. (scroll down)*

This is the third guest interview in the series: What Do We Tell The Children? How To Talk To A Child About Race and Identity.

In this episode Pastor Jamey Johnson uses a 3-teir model of “for-to-with” to distinguish between the ideology of opposing racism versus the action and sacrifice of fighting racism. He implores caregivers to honestly share the historical and current actions of white supremacy, and allow white children to fully process through responses of surprise, sadness, guilt, or shame as they are guided to the significance of loving your neighbor through word and action.

Visit ebonyramquist.com to view the resources we discuss and listen to the Lyrical Lesson partnered with this episode.

The final episode of this series will be released in February.

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Ep. 2 How Can I Ground a BIPOC Child in Honest History and the Value of Their Voice? – Rev. Darrell Gillespie

Welcome to the H.U.E Podcast!

*SPECIAL NOTE – If you have not done so, please listen to the Introduction Episode of this series first. (scroll down)*

This is the second guest interview in the series: What Do We Tell The Children? How To Talk To A Child About Race and Identity.

In this episode Rev. Darrell Gillespie emphasizes three essential principles in building a foundation of confidence and strength for BIPOC children. He encourages caregivers not to be anxious in sharing the reality of racism and its effects while grounding children in the truth of their history and the value of their voice. Rev. Gillespie’s compassion and candid insight will encourage caregivers to equip and embolden BIPOC children in moving beyond the white-washed narrative of society to the reality of their value and a bright future.

Visit ebonyramquist.com and listen to the Lyrical Lesson partnered with this episode.

The next episode with Pastor Jamey Johnson will be released on Wednesday, December 30th.

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Ep. 2 Lyrical Lesson – How Can I Ground a BIPOC Child in Honest History and the Value of Their Voice?

Tobe Nwigwe, Nell, and Fat’s music has been a balm to my soul since I first heard it. The magnetic aura of their songs gives testament to Tobe’s mission of “making purpose popular”. Their song Shine aligns with the message in this episode to equip BIPOC children with the  foundation of their identity and heritage so their voices may resonate with confidence and peace.

 

Shine – Tobe Nwigwe

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Ep. 1 Lyrical Lesson – Transracial Adoption: How Can I Teach A Heritage That Is Not My Own?

Listening to Liz Vice’s music is like soaking your soul in a warm bath – it calms, it centers, it soothes. Her song The Source speaks of our minds and souls, asking “Expand Thy wings, celestial dove, Brood over our souls night, Replace it with Your love, On our troubled spirits, move, And let there now be light, Replace the lies with truth”.

 

The Source – Liz Vice

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Ep. 1 Resources – Transracial Adoption: How Can I Teach A Heritage That Is Not My Own?

Below are resources discussed in the episode.

*H.U.E Podcast does not necessarily endorse the views of the resources below

Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop

*The APA Journal reference in this interview is incorrect, the article is located in the magazine Psychology Today*

Psychology Today,” Are Kids Racist?”, Kristina R. Olson, Ph.D., April 2013

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Ep. 1 Transracial Adoption: How Can I Teach a Heritage That is Not My Own? – Brittany Salmon

Welcome to the H.U.E Podcast!

*SPECIAL NOTE – If you have not done so, please listen to the Introduction Episode of this series first. (scroll down)*

This is the first guest interview in the series: What Do We Tell The Children? How To Talk To A Child About Race and Identity.

In this episode, Brittany Salmon speaks to the dynamics of bridging the gap between a child’s adoptive family of origin and the heritage(s) they are gifted with. While providing a clear, three-part framework to support caregivers, she also emphasizes the significance of caregivers identifying and decentering their own cultural heritage toward the goal of a multicultural home. Brittany’s mix of candid advice and heartfelt encouragement inspires caregivers to confidently continue the humble pursuit of “better”.

Visit ebonyramquist.com to view the resources we discuss and listen to the Lyrical Lesson partnered with this episode.

The next episode with Rev. Darrell Gillespie will be released on Wednesday, December 23rd.

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What Do We Tell the Children?: How to Talk to a Child About Race and Identity Introduction Episode – Lyrical Lesson

The arrival of Maverick City music on the worship scene has been a beautiful mash-up of my old school church music memories, modern musical styles, and holistic faith that looks at the Truth while also engaging reality. In a recent post about this song I stated, “This is why I speak to racism in the church without belittling, dismissing, or condemning her. This is why the church can be confronted and called out on the sin of racism without collapsing under the weight of the change repentance requires.”

 

Remember – Maverick City Music

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What Do We Tell the Children?: How to Talk to a Child About Race and Identity Introduction Episode – Resources

Below are resources discussed in the podcast episode.

*H.U.E Podcast does not necessarily endorse the views of the resources below

Divided by Faith – Emerson and Smith

How To Be An Antiracist – Kendi

The below definitions are provided to the listener as a common ground on which to discuss concepts. Guests are not required to adhere to these definitions and may challenge/provide their own in the interview.

  1. Ethnicity: An individual’s national origin(s), heritage, and singular or multiple cultural identity 
  2. Culture: The characteristic features of everyday existence (such as diversions or a way of life) shared by people in a place or time (Merriam Webster)
  3. Social Construct: An idea that has been created and accepted by the people in a society (Merriam Webster)
  4. Race: A social construct where we attach social significance and meaning to certain physical characteristics (i.e. skin color). (Emerson and Smith, Divided by Faith
    1. Note: the H.U.E Podcast recognizes there is only one biological race
  5. Racialized society: a society wherein race matters profoundly for differences in life experiences, life opportunities, and social relationships and a society that rewards or punishes along racial lines  (Emerson and Smith, Divided by Faith
  6. BIPOC: Black, Indigenous, People of Color; this acronym highlights the racialized caste system or hierarchy specifically in the U.S.
  7. Discrimination: Action based on prejudice. Everyone discriminates. (Diangelo, White Fragility)
  8. Racism :Racism is a marriage of racist policies and racist ideas that produces and normalizes racial inequities (Kendi, How to be an Antiracist)
  9. Antiracist: One who is supporting an antiracist policy through their actions or expressing an antiracist idea. (Kendi, How to be an Antiracist)
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